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Tynax ~ Patent Library

Patent for Sale:

Intranasal Drug or Vaccine Delivery Device    

Delivery system for optimal drug or vaccine delivery to the nose.

Overview

Our system was achieved by focusing on one key problem: The mucosal surfaces of the nasal cavity are where pharmaceutical uptake is most efficient, and are also the area that is hardest to reach due to the complex shape of the nasal passage ways. Traditional spray devices with their droplets tend to adhere near the external nares, and majority of drug drains right back out. If you inhale to draw aerosol deeper into the nose, the droplets may get inhaled into the lungs or swallowed, which can result in damage rather than treatment.

The goal was to get active ingredient to effective pass through the nasal valve, land in the mucosal nasal target area, but stay out of the lungs. The patented technology is an intranasal delivery device based on “aerodynamic flow focusing,” which uses negative pressure to establish a flow pattern that avoids obstacles. This is achieved by drawing air from one nostril while providing aerosol to the other nostril. This device show a highly efficient circulation, longer residence time in the central portion of the nasal cavity, and improved distribution of drug and vaccine active ingredients where drug uptake is optimized.

Primary Application of the Technology

Drug or vaccine delivery to the nose. Nasal administration is emerging as a method of delivering medications directly to the blood stream. This method of delivery can eliminate the need for intravenous catheters while still achieving rapid, effective blood levels of the medication administered.

The Problem Solved by the Technology

Existing nasal delivery devices rely on direct pressurized injection of mist into the nostril. Nasal delivery systems are very sensitive to (a) Spray device orientation and depth of insertion into nose, (c) Complicated internal nasal geometry, (d) Initial droplet velocity (user pressing plunger), and (e) Inhalation / breathing pattern. Importantly, these devices require patient respiratory coordination during the delivery process, and one difficulty is patient fear / acceptance of blowing into their own nose. Additional challenges include:

• Correct administration method for e.g. spray device (device orientation and depth of insertion)
• Dose reproducibility
• Aerosol inhalation and swallowing

How the Technology Solves the Problem

The device avoids these problems through the use of moderate suction (creating negative pressure) rather than positive pressure. This creates a “flow path” through the complicated nasal geometry in which aerosols simply follow the air flow through both nasal cavities. This delivery method automatically creates a bi-directional airflow that:

• Circulates and retains drug within the nasal passages, promoting deposition on mucosal nasal surfaces
• In so doing, leads to a higher percentage of drug being absorbed, enabling use of less drug or vaccine for equivalent or better outcome, and
• Prevents aerosol from moving into the lungs.

Competitive Advantage

Administering medications via the nasal method offers several advantages: (a) provides a direct route into the blood stream, (b) avoids gastrointestinal destruction and hepatic first pass metabolism (destruction of drugs by liver enzymes) allowing more drug to be bioavailable than if it were administered orally, and (c) for ease, convenience and safety: intranasal drug administration is painless, does not require sterile technique, or invasive devices. Can be used for mass vaccinations in developed and developing countries by non-medical personnel.

Existing nasal delivery devices rely on direct pressurized injection of mist into the nostril. These devices require patient respiratory coordination during the delivery process and correct administration method for e.g. spray device (device orientation and depth of insertion). Typically, the efficiency of the method is low, i.e. wasting a lot of drug, and low reproducibility. Additional challenges include:

• Correct administration method for e.g. spray device (device orientation and depth of insertion).
• Dose reproducibility, complicated by pressure from patient blowing
• Aerosol inhalation and swallowing
• Single use (contamination of entire device by patient blowing)

The patented device avoids these problems through the use of moderate suction (creating negative pressure) rather than positive pressure. This creates a “flow path” through the complicated nasal geometry in which aerosols simply follow the air flow, which positions them to adhere to the central nasal cavity.

The seller may consider selling these patents individually.

Patent Summary

U.S. Patent Classes & Classifications Covered in this listing:

Class 128: Surgery

Methods of treatment of the living body and apparatus used in the inspection and treatment of diseases, wounds, and other abnormal conditions of the bodies of humans and lower animals. This class includes methods and means for manufacturing surgical appliances which are not classifiable in other classes.

Subclass 203.22: Means for supplying, or permitting inhalation of, separate streams of treating agent/respiratory gas mixture through nasal passages
Subclass 207.18: Respiratory gas supply means enters nasal passage